# 3rd Year EEE Advice

This document is a comprehensive guide aiming to make it easier for EEE students to choose their modules for 3rd year, as well as containing general advice for the year.

Additional information on modules can be found by looking at SOLE survey (opens new window) results, although if you're looking for a more unfiltered view then you're probably in the right place.

For modules shared between EEE and EIE, you are welcome to check the EIE document for relevant feedback (if you're considering a software module you should probably look at them). Pre-2021/22 content might be a mix of both streams.

This document is maintained by the EEE departmental representative, instructions to maintain can be found here (opens new window).

If you'd like to add feedback, please submit it here (opens new window) (Please check that the year of the survey matches your current academic year, and if it doesn't contact your dep rep!)

# Module Listing

You can check out the full list of modules using the links below.

# General Advice

# 2021-22

I'm pushing some current 3rd Years to get some advice, will update when I have it. Also, unfortunately I wasn't able to get much feedback from the EEE students, I tried my best 😦 - Simon

# Industrial Placement Advice

Here's a quick summary of some important points:

  • Apply to lots of places, expect many rejections
  • Track your applications (most use Excel)
  • Practice hackerrank / leetcode for coding challenges if you're going into software
  • Research the company for non-technical interview prep (what do they do, why do you want to work there, why you'd be a good fit)
  • Always ask for feedback from the interviewers
  • Start early (before term starts)
  • Good luck, try not to get disheartened 😃

You're always welcome to ask me for advice 😊 - Simon 2021-22

Ask people in higher years who interned at the companies you're interested in. They'll give you interview tips, help you on the CV and tell you exactly what it's like working at the company as a student intern. Potentially they'll also refer you in some cases. For software intervies, lettcode is good, but in-person practice is 10 times better in my opinion. Try to get on face-to-face session per week with a friend or someone in a higher year with more technical interview experience. For PM and non-technical interviews, read "Cracking the PM interview". It provides you with general rules and guidelines on how to structure your answers and guide yourself through the interviewer's questions. Most recruitment starts in August for tech and trading, start reaching out to recruiters by then. - Jaafar 2020-21

Start applying as early as possible – get your CV/LinkedIn/whatever else ready before term starts and then start applying. The earlier you get your placement sorted out the easier your life will be. Also – you'll probably be rejected by most places. If you’re going for a software role, make sure you practice a lot beforehand as well. - JZ, 2020-21

It’s ok to get your application rejected. It happens. And it’s ok if you don’t end up getting a placement. That can also happen. None of this defines you. - Aaman, 2020-21

Be great at one programming language (show dem your projects), have semi-decent grades, demonstrate your communication skills and landing a placement is just an arm-length away. After couple of failures, you would learn what interviewers want to hear and what interviewers don’t want to know about. 2020-21 Z

Advice for aspiring SWE candidates targeting placements at big tech/tech in finance – grind leetcode over summer and apply early. Positions fill up early and are highly competitive as you’ll be competing with DoC students too. Brush up on core CS fundamentals (OS, data structures, algorithms) as these get asked frequently too. Take note of groupwork/previous internship experiences that you can bring up during behavioral interviews and prepare well for these too. - Daryl 20/21

It’s ok if you get rejected like 1000 times. I promise a load of other people are too. Get in the applications early like September/ August. Try to focus on a few companies you really want and spend the summer practising programming or reading over notes etc to prepare. Then start applying to companies you may not have considered. Update your LinkedIn!! You can get recruited off it. Also ask some of the older years. It also helps if you have a spreadsheet of companies to keep organised. Try and focus your applications – I didn’t which was fine in the end but stressful writing a bunch of different field cover letters. Just put yourself out there; don’t hold back on your skills in your CV. Once you do enough applications, you’ll know how to sell yourself so trust the process. If you don’t find anything, the group projects can also get you graduate roles and they’re really fun!! They also help when it comes to graduate applications so either way you don’t "lose". If you want to go into tech in finance, leetcode and hackerrank are your best friends. Best of Luck !!! - Simi 2020-21

Understand yourself better, what careers you want to pursue, how to represent yourself in CV/Cover letter, compare your current skills set to your desire jobs requirement, find areas to improve. – 2019/20

Start applying early! Oct is a good time to start applying. – 2019/20

Focus on applications - those are more important – 2019/20

Apply to a LOT and don't be disheartened by not getting responses. – Yusuf, 2019/20

Man just get a placement, like start searching at the beginning of the year. Group project is alright but its no replacement for being paid. - 2019/20

Spend all of October and November applying! Best to have an offer before the end of the year, Then you can really chill out in second term. And Get ready for lots of rejections – Kunal, 2019

Go careers fair (if it's not cancelled because of corona), check websites/LinkedIn for applications – Tarik, 2019/20

# Shared EE Modules (Autumn)

Most EEE modules this term are fully exam based, where assessment take place over the last 2 weeks of term. Some modules also have include coursework (worth ~20%, may differ per module).

# Communication Systems

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2020-21

Exam is heavily based on the extensive problem sets so get to know them well! It's a very very long and varied course. It really does develop your intuition. Hassle Manikas when you have questions and you will get them answered. Really patient guy. Super passionate about his subject.

Really liked the module all in all, and would recommend to anyone interested in Comms. Personally found the content very demanding, mainly due to the sheer volume. There is a lot of stuff. The exam is comparatively straightforward, and if you do and understand all the problem sheet questions, the exam wont be too bad. If you put in the effort, it will pay off. There is also a coursework element to the module over Christmas on MATLAB, which isn't easy but manageable over the break. Manikas is also very good, explaining content well and also answering questions effectively.

This module is highly recommended to anyone interested in Comms. The content is long and can become difficult to understand in the end. The exam is based on the problem sheet questions, so being able to solve these questions is key to scoring well in the exam. There is also a CW assignment over Christmas, which requires a solid understanding of the second part of the module, which has more demanding concepts. Manikas is a good lecturer, who wants to support students and is willing to answer questions, so it’s definitely worth asking him about concepts you do not understand.

# Digital Signal Processing

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2020-21

Dr. Stathaki's slides are example rich and the exam draws entirely from the maths demonstrated in the slides. However, it's fair to say that this course is more theoretical and mathematical than in previous years.

The slides are quite detailed and extensive however the pace of the explanations can sometimes be long winded during the lectures however Dr Stathaki is always happy to help and explain anything if you didn't understand it. The modules is quite theoretical but gives you a good basis of DSP however be ready to commit to doing a lot of theoretical maths to be good at this module. The exam was entirely based on the lecture slides with some extension of concepts.

Dr Stathaki’s slides are detailed and contain loads of examples and thorough explanations. The lecturers can be boring because she sometimes devotes too much time to easier concepts, which leads to a slow pace. That said, she always happy to answer questions either in the lecture or via email (she’ll get back to you in 24 hours usually). The exam was quite heavy mathematically, which means you need to practice effectively the math concepts she teaches. You should try to get access to the 2020 exam and to the sample exams she gave us because her style significantly differs from Naylor.

# Control Engineering

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 5.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 3.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 3.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 4.0 out of 5
# Comments

Content is reflected in the exam, but the exam is quite tough! So make sure you really understand everything

Astolfi is a good lecturer, keeping you engaged in lectures. Lectures are fast-paced but you get used to them, make sure you interrupt for questions if you need to. Astolfi doesn’t reply to questions in email (from my experience at least) and even though I wasn’t in College during exam period and deliberately asked him to help me via email/Teams, he asked me again to come to College, which I didn’t. Ended up answering the questions with friends/after working more on exercises. So make sure if you need help you show up, or pester him, or ask as early as you can, to ensure you get your answers. Resources are primarily the lecture notes (I didn’t use any book or additional resources, and found that notes Astolfi makes during the lecture are much better, and sufficient for the exam, than the actual pre-written lecture notes, which are very mathematical and abstract for no reason in my opinion. So that, along with past papers, should get you ready for exams. Other than that, module is pretty mathematical and the exam is pretty standard (make sure you do most (or all!) of the past papers and you will be legend for the exams). In our case, the exercises at the end of the lecture notes were much harder than the actual exam and the past papers, but still do them to be prepared and avoid any surprise. No coursework for this module, which is good if you want a free Christmas holiday! - Valy (EEE)

# 2020-21

I agree with the other comments, the examples at the back of the book are brilliant. The book itself feels overwhelming so glance through it every once in a while and definitely use it for revision. There are some things explained in the book not explicitly covered in the lectures but are still examinable. For example: Dead beat controller/observer. Really useful module overall if picked with maths for signals and systems as they both complement each other a lot! You might have a tough time if you don't pick maths.

The book is quite remarkable, but unless you are a comfortable first class student it's very hard going. However, the 30 exercises at the back are brilliant and able practice. This year's exam was exceptionally difficult. Actually, the previous year's was very difficult too. Only take this module if you are ready to commit to it.

The book itself is quite daunting however for the content you definitely need Maths or do it in your ownste time. The exam is quite difficult hence only take it if you are committed to the module. The module is generally quite abstract and theoretical however covers a lot of content. So only take the module if you are ready to commit to it hardcore and actually interested in control.

Most people here tend to read the book, I prefer watching youtube lectures. Here are some useful channels: John Rossiter, megr438, Matthew Wright, Jonathan Sprinkle(more about self driving cars with control), MathDoctorBob, MATLAB (for filters), Steve Brunton (best one).

Great lecturer, I found the combo of (actually) watching his lectures + reading the notes working. If you like the ‘understanding’ part more than the tons of theoritical knowledge you might like this course. However if you’re looking for a module where you can just learn stuff by heart maybe pick another one. - MG

The module was interesting and I enjoyed being able to pretty much learn from the book but I got wrecked by the exam because I didn’t revise enough. You definitely need to put in the work but the actual content isn’t too bad. I also had to cram all of maths for signals but it was helpful even for 4th year stuff😊 - Simi (EEE)

# Mathematics for Signals and Systems

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

The module is not hard and it would be a great choice if you just want to get some good grades. The content is almost repeating.

Pretty standard but pretty neat module, the 2nd year Mathematics (Mathematics for Engineers II) module literally has the copied and pasted notes from this module, so overlap is an understatement, this is the linear algebra part of your course copied over word for word, no exaggeration, (SVD, Fundemental Subspaces, Diagonalization, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, etc) so if you banged that out in 2nd year, this one is a good one to take for some guaranteed marks. The exam varies little year on year but this year we had more curveballs probably due to the online-setting. For any topics where you lack understanding use the 2nd year notes it will help more, or use the Gil Strang youtube videos. Although as updated advice for those using the new EE course I whole-heartedly just suggest going over your old notes and lectures from 2nd year because that helped me more than actually attending the lectures did. There is a lot of hidden value in this module though because a lot of the concepts you pick up and refine end up being heavily utilised in optimization, as well as ML (particularly with convolutional neural networks), honestly just take it to fill in one of your mandated EE slots if you’re like me and have a preference for the DoC modules. - Aryan (EIE)

Nice professor in my opinion. UTAs/GTAs are really useful too on edStem so this module flowed really well. Yeah as Aryan covered above, most of the content is just the same as that in 2nd Year. - Nelson (EIE)

# 2020-21

Get watching those Gil Strang YouTube vids early! That really made all the difference come exam time. There are a lot of shortcuts and tricks with linear algebra. If you try and use the slides alone you will fill a lot more pages and be prone to error.

The lectures don't cover much content compared to any other modules so do practice examples a lot. Hence I also suggest to get a linear algebra book to get more detail and learn the tricks of how to do things. The exam was allright in my opinion covers mostly what has been covered and there are quite a few past exam papers. This module is essential to quite a few others.

Do watch Gil Strang's lectures before the start of the term. He covers the course quite quickly, so it doesn't leave too much room to understand the material. In addition he tend to be more focused on the application of linear algebra, rather then the math. But this is third year, so there is the expectation that your math is pretty good. In sum do yourself a favour and spend two weeks prior to term watching Gil Strangs, so you can understand his lectures. Also for tls(not covered by Gil strangs) you might consider watching this video on youtube: Pillai "Ax= b, Least Squares (LS) & Total Least Squares (TLS)".

As everyone else has probably mentioned, start watching Gilbert Strang’s lecturers before the start of term and get the textbook (borrow it from the library- it has at least 10 copies). Dragotti’s slides do not help you pick up the techniques you need to solve linear algebra problems, because they focus more on applications. The way to do well is to study the techniques on your own using GIlbert’s resources, or anything else you may find useful, and then go over Dragotti’s slides to check understanding and learn how to tackle more application-oriented problems. Dragotti is quite happy to answer questions, so it is worth asking him if you’re stuck with anything.

# Artificial Intelligence

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

Where to start? There are definitely some parts of this module that are useful, such as learning Prolog and different search algorithms. That’s pretty much where the good stuff ends. Most of your time will be spent learning about and manipulating logic. The exam was heavily based around Calculus KE – Google it and you won’t find anything on it, and the lecturer himself couldn’t even remember what KE stands for. Most of the content is just so incredibly niche, and the exam so time pressured, that I would really be hesitant to recommend this module. If you are really looking to get into AI/ML, there are better modules to take, as others have mentioned.

This is a good module, however incredibly badly named. It has more to do with declarative programming, logic & search/optimisation algorithms than "artificial intelligence" as such – I would recommend it as the content was engaging, course materials were good & the U/GTAs were helpful, but make sure you look at the materials before you choose it if you can.

In my opinion this was a very bad module. The course is very unstructured and there’s not much resources to go off of. In exams you get unnecessarily punished not for pointless things that DO NOT reflect how much you actually know about the content (e.g., making the answer of a question 80 lines/ 3 pages long and if you make a little mistake anywhere in those 80 lines you lose marks only for a small number of marks). I have spent most of my hours trying to contact the lecturer on very unclear topics that he has not properly explained in his lectures or written well about in the slides and sometimes get no response. The tutorials he provides are not complete and you will spend loads of hours doing these tutorials when it is worth a very small amount in the actual exam. You CANNOT do the exam without doing ALOT of past papers because most of the exam are not inside the tutorials. I will promise you it is NOT worth it.

In my opinion, I would say that this module’s displayed commitment time is highly unrepresentative of the actual time needed to be ‘good’ at this module. A lot of emphasis is placed on labs and tutorials to develop a finer understanding in AI, but ultimately it’s all for nothing because nothing of ultimate relavance was included in the final exam, there was no ‘coursework’ contribution or at least some sort of safety net to compensate for the work we put in, the exam itself included a lot of questions which are super beefed versions of tutorial questions (of which we got the solutions very late for), and lab questions (of which were rather unorganized), coincidentally, one of the larger logic questions in the exam was a specific niche corner of an already rather niche part of the course (iykyk), which was not only barely touched in the lectures except for one pass, but apparently the solution for an associated problem of this type was not even provided, this was also never seen on years of past papers. I spent several pages trying to do one subquestion from that exam, and spent an hour of my time just in doing that almost. The biggest chunk of the logic half of that course has 2 (two) major resources, one being the Professor plugging his own research paper, which is indecipherable on its own, and the other being a rather obscure PDF from an academic who coincidentally was a former student/colleague of the professor, this however constituted 50% of the exam though, which we had barely any prep to study for, and the time I spent which could’ve better been spent on my DoC modules. In my opinion like the above answers postulate, if you want to take a module to get into this area of learning, just do DoC/EE ML and Maths to make your life easier rather than spending time trying to figure out whether you were meant to branch on line 39 of your KE tree or not (and I highly doubt you’ll be asked in a FAANG interview about existential qualifiers, but maybe that’s just me).

# 2020-21

I personally found the lecturer Jeremy Pitt to be brilliant at making the material engaging and helpful in any issues people had. The content is enjoyable to work through. The tutorials do not fully cover the knowledge needed for the exam but are very useful to do alongside past years papers. Unlike some modules, a genuine understanding of the course is needed for the exam specifically with things relating to Prolog.

# Communication Networks

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

Module is very interesting in terms of communication protocols, internet networks and systems if you want to get into that (also many jobs appreciate having some knowledge into comms, especially in satellite or energy systems). It’s not particularly hard, I find Barria pretty standard, not particularly exciting, but does cover all the material you need to know. He is approachable for questions, answers emails and you can very easily interrupt him during the lectures – he engages a lot in conversations and questions, and you felt you could ask him whatever. He follows the notes, but expands sometimes, and with a good revision over all the exercises you will be alright. Some friends used the book to understand better, but I found asking questions during the lectures were alright for the exam. The exam was as expected, practice the past papers as in every module, revise the lecture notes (if exam remote you don’t have to memorise them, just understand them I would say), and you will be fine for the exam. -Valy (EEE)

I enjoyed the module although I agree that the notes and teaching are not the best. As an EEE student, I didn’t really know anything about networks, OSI etc. but the content wasn’t intimidating so I ended up becoming really interested in this area. The recommended textbooks are a really good and interesting introduction to comms networks although they are not that helpful for the exam, so make sure you really understand the slides and past papers well (a lot of memorisation). Barria is friendly and happy to answer questions, but his explanations can be chaotic. -Kasia (EEE)

There are loads of contents to remember, even it is an open book exam. Choose it if you are really interested in communication protocols and networks. Though the grade is not that bad, it will cost more energy than other modules. And some of the content is a bit confusing, as well as the answers, don’t hesitate to ask question during lectures or through email.

# 2020-21

I personally found the notes and slides provided very poor and the lecturer didn't hold my attention well. Any slide can come up in the exam even if brushed over in 30 seconds of a lecture. That said, the exam is very basic and can be done easily if you know the material well.

Agree with most above, Barria is nice but bad at teaching. He just reads his notes and you can do just as well not attending lectures and learning all his slides. It’s a shame because OSI is such an interesting module. For EIE students who took Comms with DoC in 2nd year it might be worth it, less content to learn. - MG

# Machine Learning (EE)

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

This module is required to take deep learning in spring

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 4.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 3.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 2.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 3.0 out of 5
# 2020-21

Watch the Caltech lectures, they help a lot! The exam this year was quite challenging, but the module is interesting. I won't say it is taught in the best way possible and a lot of times, solutions given can be wrong, but this module has improved over previous years and hopefully it will improve even more. The phrasing of questions in exams is very weird sometimes and there is a chance you might not understand it. Overall, due to the lack of practice material, I will say this was one of my most underprepared exams!

Read through the Caltech lectures or any ML learning groups. Being remote asynchronous this term watching lectures on you own time with not the best explanations. The lecture does seem to be improved compared to the last years lectures. Get your linear algebra together because it will really help your understanding. The exam had weird phrasing and only having 2 past papers and some other examples which are not representative in terms of what they ask is though. The module content is interesting though. Get your report writing skills together because it takes long to type it into overleaf.

Caltech lectures will cover about 80% of the course (watch it before the term starts), they have started adding new content, good for the long run not for the exams. Again, here are some resources. Recomended channels: Ahmet Sacan, statquest(best), Victor Lavrenko, Naveen Kumar. Also, you don't really need to learn python, Matlab is good enough. Coursework requires minimal coding, you only need it to run routines so you can plot graphs, else you will need to do it by hand.

Cannot recommend the Caltech lectures enough, Abu-Mostafa is excellent at explaining content in an understandable way. The same cannot be said for the Imperial lecturers, though they do try. Course is mathematically very rigorous (doing Maths course will help), and to my disappointment there is essentially no practical element (very little coding) to it. The exam is also quite tough, more so due to the vagueness of the questions and the phrasing rather than the actual solution itself. Coursework is useful for the exam, for our year it was essentially the 2019 paper.

I’d say if you want to do well in this module, you cannot rely on lectures/lecture notes alone. The module is centred around ML theory and the maths behind it. It takes some effort to understand the topics discussed in the lectures. In the end, you need to figure out what additional resources work for you to help you understand. I found the Caltech lectures intriguing (although not adequately covering certain topics), as well as online articles (just googling specific ML topics). The GTA hours and the forum were a great help too. - Aaman

Did not go to a single lecture and was absolutely fine. I read the book and the extension to it. Oh wait I’ll attach it. http://amlbook.com/ which is the learning from data book. If you read that and some of the ebook chapters on the website, you’ll be fine. He even has video lectures (Caltech I think). It is quite maths and theory involved. Always great to look for other sources online no matter what module you’re taking. Very good and useful module for the CV – Simi (EEE)

# EEE-Only Modules (Autumn)

# Analogue Integrated Circuits and Systems

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 5.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 4.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 5.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 4.0 out of 5
# Comments

Very hard module to digest, but still manageable and was very, very interesting!

# 2020-21

Personally, a game changer for me in terms of analogue electronics. Used to hate analogue in year 1 and 2 but Toumazou provides a different outlook on analogue (which for me made it way easier to understand). The lectures were good, they were recorded and his scribbles on the pages were great too. Sure, the exam questions remain pretty similar every year but it means that I focused way more on the topics I wanted to learn more in depth about. Would recommend for anyone looking for a different, more practical outlook with analogue but just don’t expect like you’re going to understand as in depth as you’d imagine. - HH

I didn’t really learn the content in depth but the exams very much repeat themselves so you can still do well. I used to be awful at analogue in year 1 so don’t let that deter you too much as this module made so much sense. I remember actually enjoying the content – Simi

The exams are repetitive but if you’re looking for a more intuitive understanding of analogue circuits without all the maths in 1st and 2nd year, this course is really good. Even though I maybe didn’t learn concepts in a lot of depth, I still remember and understand all the concepts he taught because the way he teaches in my opinion is quite memorable. I think this is the only analogue module that has this specialty in all 4 years in this department. He also brings in a lot of practical applications of the concepts he teaches, the more higher-level circuitry you look at in the course is used a lot in industry.

My placement was in a chip design company, and I used a lot of theory from his lectures – Karina

# Biomedical electronics

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 5.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 3.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 5.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 3.0 out of 5
# Comments

Exam content was reflected in the exam, but exam skills to answer the questions was not at all there

# 2020-21

This is a weird one – the actual concept is very interesting, but for me, it does require a real interest to keep up with all the material. It is quite a lot, and need to have a good understanding. Not many past papers, which I didn’t really like but what to do, so make sure you do ALL of them. The exam was pretty standard and (for me) easier than expected, which was a relief as I was particularly stressed for it beforehands. Anyway, the exercises help, but make sure you remember circuits pretty well (you can revisit them on the spot, but it helps if you are up to date with it). I didn’t really enjoy the change of lecturers, as everyone was having the resources in a different place, which is a bit confusing to keep track of, but it is what it is. Pantelis and Constandinou are pretty interesting, and the lecture by Mitcheson is great – Valy

This module pulls together parts from content in the first two years mainly analogue circuits, however a basic understanding is all that's needed. The content is enjoyable to learn about and feels rewarding. The lecturer is very slow with emails if they even bother to reply at all so hopefully you can go in person to their office to get a response. However, the exam is challenging and requires a good understanding to answer questions not directly taken from the notes.

Great module for engineers, it forces you to think about the practical aspect of engineering. Most modules prior, with the exception of analogue 2 are theoretical. What do I mean? Most modules tend to have one answer and one approach, which is not real engineering. This will be one of the modules that expect you to approximate and make assumptions to make your calculations easier. If you have no interest in biology then, it will not be a pleasant experience. Understand how to apply the knowledge and attend all gta hours, they are very useful. Content is a lot but not too hard to understand, do as many papers as you can, it will help you get used to the style of the exams.

It’s a pretty general overview of the field which is fun. Analogue electronics massively helped in my understanding. You do have to somewhat want to learn about biology. I thought the module was really nice and actually watched some lectures. Lots of practise on the past papers is needed but once it clicks, the exams aren’t too bad. - Simi

# Electrical Energy Systems

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 5.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 5.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 3.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 4.0 out of 5
# Comments

Bit more UTA/GTA Help would be appreciated, was hard at times to get help from already busy lecturers

# 2020-21

Well taught module. Dr. Chaudhuri really knows the ins and outs of Power Systems and explains it really well. Always ask questions after lectures if you have any doubts. Exam was easy because it was open-book this year.... if it wasn’t I probably would have done terribly because of the amount of formulas there are. - Z

The material for us was split into two parts taught by separate lecturers. Both were brilliant at explaining everything and providing plenty of examples to practice and understand. Very equation and calculation heavy topics which can be beneficial or detrimental to you individually depending on if you a good with that.

Taught by two different lecturers, generally focused on power generation and transmission as well as some stuff on generators. Fairly tough but not too bad. Exams can vary

Bit confusing module (partly because of the change of lecturers, in my opinion they are pretty different). I couldn’t really understand Tei and the explantions didn’t feel particularly coherent. Didn’t go to most lectures in the end as they couldn’t keep my attention. However – make sure you watch the recordings, as the ppt’s Fei gives are incomplete, and in our case, the completed versions were never uploaded! Definitely need to copy all the notes down to make sure you are covered for exams. Chaudhuri is more enjoyable in terms of thoroughly explaining the material and the slides cover pretty much everything (for the rest do ALL the exam papers to make sure you get as much practice as possible). Make sure you understand the material as he goes along and don’t leave any gaps for the end, you will struggle to understand everything and work through everything. As a person who loves energy, I found this module too detailed and focued on faults, rather than giving a broader understanding of energy systems (there was a bit in the beginning, but I would have liked a broader idea, but this is pure personal preference and not an actual comment for the module, just make sure you know what to expect beforehands).

# Microwave Technology

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

Prof. Lucyszyn is very passionate about his research and happily answers any questions, so if you have a genuine interest in microwave and RF, you can really learn a lot. Otherwise, it’s more trouble than it’s worth. Difficult, little guidance and I found the exam scope quite vague. The course in some ways follows from 2nd year Electromagnetism, but it’s a lot more nuanced and advanced. You need to do a lot of work on your own before you can understand the slides and other than past papers there are no exercises you can use for practice. Preparing for exams was really confusing and I was really unsure how to approach it. Though coursework (that was introduced in 2021/22) is easy marks (worth 20% of the module) and quite interesting.

# 2020-21

I personally didn't find the teaching too bad, it's just the exam expects you to be 100% and beyond in the subject and the preparation for the exam is just doing exam papers, there are no problem sheets or anything to ease you into the course. While they did try and help toy with the questions, the support wasn't that great to be honest. It's just an advanced course with too little time and little support. I would choose it if you covered it slightly beforehand or you would need to put a bit of work in during the term to get a decent grade out of the exam. If you prepare well enough it's not that bad. You just need to study elsewhere, as the lecture notes are not enough but unfortunately microwaves is one of those niche areas in EE.

# Optoelectronics

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2020-21

Slides are a bit heavy, a lot of maths and wave theory. Personally found it interesting. Exam is generally quite heavily based off of slides

# Semiconductor Devices

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

A brand new formulation of the old Y1 and Y2 semiconductor devices modules. I would say the content is very extensive but not overly difficult to follow, as long as you manage to keep up with the lectures. There are a lot of nice problem sheets and sample questions available, and the 2021-22 exam was stupidly easy compared to the actual content of the course, which can be dense and difficult to conceptualize some times. Nevertheless, I wholeheartedly recommend this module for anyone with an interest in solid-state physics and the fundamentals of transistor characteristics, which are, in some sense optional, but also very helpful to know for both analogue and digital VLSI design. The lecturer, Dr. Duranni, was very good at teaching this module with helpful illustrations and diagrams, and was more than happy to answer any solid-state physics/semiconductor questions after the lecture.

# Shared EE Modules (Spring)

These modules are "coursework only", although many of them have some kind of test/quiz which counts towards your grade. Some coursework deadlines extend past the end of term (although ideally this shouldn't happen)

# Digital System Design

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 1.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 3.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 4.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 3.0 out of 5

# 2020-21

Really good module for developing an understanding of digital systems. It really helped to see just how much of a difference different design techniques made. The lectures were nice but seemed disconnected to the coursework imo. The coursework is time-consuming, and you need to be really on top of it as there will be loads of errors/bugs but as others have said, it’s very rewarding. - HH

Very time-consuming module. Definitely worth taking if you enjoyed Digital Electronics (with Professor Cheung) and Computer Architecture (Dr Clarke). As our DSD was done remotely, it was very hard to sort out debugging issues in a short amount of time, so be prepared to allocate a lot of time in the week for sorting out issues related to this module. GTAs are helpful but generally you do not get much time to speak with them. Dr Bouganis is very supportive and wants to help you out wherever he can, so be sure to ask him plenty of questions. His feedback for the 3 reports you are required to complete is also very detailed and helps you to learn. - Arijit (EEE)

# Advanced Signal Processing

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 4.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 2.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 2.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 2.0 out of 5
# Comments

Not much coursework support considering it was worth 100%.

# 2020-21

I would recommend this module only for those who are interested in signal processing and/or machine learning principles. Professor Mandic tries to make the lecture content interesting by including real-world examples, which I thought was a really good idea, however this content does not help at all with the 2 coursework assignments (Interim report due normally beginning of February and Final report (and code) due end of March).

One thing that I did not like about the Interim Report was the feedback I got back. For me, it did not give me any opportunities to learn, just ways to improve how my write my LaTeX code. However apparently the point of the Interim Report is to check whether you can design a report correctly, so bear that in mind.

A word of warning for the final report, don’t expect to get any feedback for it until mid-August and the final grade till mid-September (for the 2020-21 year, MEng EEE/EIE students got letter grades back on the 15th of September). This feedback is not individual feedback. They send out an email to the whole ASP cohort which gives comments on how the group performed on the questions. The document can be found here (opens new window)

In my opinion, GTA support for this module is quite poor compared to other 3rd year modules. The GTAs don’t show up until after you finish the Interim report, and when you ask them questions, they are unwilling to give answers, since the coursework has not been changed for several years. They are also in general very slow to respond to questions you post on the Q+A forums. Make sure that plenty of live sessions are organized, as they are happy to discuss the concepts in the lecture slides.

To wrap this up, I am only giving my experience after taking this module remotely. There is a lot of interesting content, but you must assess whether you want to put the effort into the two reports, based on how much feedback you will receive. Also make sure to contact the Head of Year and Director of Undergraduate Studies if feedback is not being released after an adequate amount of time.

The content is interesting for those who want to learn about real-world signal processing. However, the lecturer is not great at explaining and rarely bothers to answer questions over email or on Teams, which is so disappointing given the module was taught remotely. The GTA support is also bad because they often seem confused with the content themselves or will give vague or contradictory answers. Being passionate about signal processing, and asking higher years who took the module to compare plots is essential to doing well here. The CW is a 40 page report based on a long set of MATLAB exercises. You should start working on it ASAP and put in enough hours per week so you don’t end up scrambling in the end.

This module is awful. The content is interesting and the applications are useful, but the general feedback and support is terrible, and Mandic does a bad job of explaining some tough concepts. I wouldn’t recommend this course unless you have a serious interest in signal processing.

# Real-Time Digital Signal Processing

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2020-21

Short answer: don’t pick it unless there is a guarantee that the module was fixed. Nothing was done in C or assembly, only simulink. The lectures are very insightful about real-time DSP, yet most of the things were really improvised "on-the-go" style, especially that no solution was practically provided or possible for the largest coursework piece. Also no GTAs, so careful about support! (Although Adria is super kind and helpful, and answered all emails and questions throughout the term) Update: there will be a lot of improvements to the module next year, I believe it’s worth taking the module after aligning your expectations correctly.

Adria changed the content of the module significantly from 19/20, as everything was done with an under-powered TI board on Simulink. The lecturers give you some insight into practical DSP, but unless you took autumn-term DSP, you will not really know why you’re doing what you're doing. There was also no GTA support, so do try to confirm with him that he will actually have GTAs this year. On the bright side, Adria is supportive and willing to help students out. He was generous with how much time he devoted to support and answers emails quickly.

# High Level Programming

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2020-21

Honestly I really enjoyed this module. Take it if you want to be a better programmer. You get out what you put in. F# is actually a really nice language to write in. Be aware that it is taught by Tom Clarke – you’ll know whether you like him or not from first year I reckon. Make sure you pick a good group – you'll be working a lot with your group and (unless it changes) you only pick half of the group. Also make sure you learn how to use Git beforehand! - JZ (EIE)

Some people say this module is tough. I honestly don’t think it is once you understand what functional programming is all about - so try to do that. F# is a very productive language to work with – it’s easy to debug, the code looks beautiful and it’s...well, high level. In comparison, I find C++ rather stressful as you need to keep track of the variables you’ve declared...F# is just functions! As JZ mentions, it can improve your ability as a programmer. I recommend checking the module out to see if it is for you. – Aaman (EIE)

The final coursework is kinda hard but really rewarding. Dr Tom Clarke is amazing but he’s still Dr Tom Clarke so it’s a really independent-learning module. It is still worth asking him or the GTAs for any help. Get the worksheets in early and try to ace the timed programming segment to put you in the best position for the final coursework. That one can be hard. The struggle of this project is picking a great group in my opinion as the workload is hefty at the end when you have a bunch of other deadlines but I was pretty lucky. If you like programming, it is really interesting learning functional programming so I would encourage taking it. - Simi (EEE)

Functional programming moves basic programming ideas to the compiler. Overheads such as creating looping iterators are removed, so you don’t need (for int i=0; …..) anymore and can write more high-level, concise code. It is a great skill to have and even Python supports it. If you can follow the worksheets that Tom Clarke has prepared you are definitely set to ace the coursework. Coursework’s workload may not be evenly distributed among your team so make sure you voice out your concerns to the GTA’s or to Tom Clarke as early as possible if such situation is happening.

# Embedded Systems

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 3 respondants.

  • Content: 3.33 out of 5
  • Organisation: 3.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 2.67 out of 5
  • Overall: 3.33 out of 5
# Comments

Feel like it was more catered for EIE students

I absolutely loved this module. you get two separate pieces of cw. Use a raspberry pi which uses micro python and next one using an stm32 with c++. probably the best module i have taken at imperial so far. Very fun and useful module, gives you a very good intro and the projects are self driven you decide where to take the projects, what you do, what style of systems you develop etc the lectures are 100% a must watch here if you want to do well as it gives info you will not easily find online.

This is not an easy module, you need a good team as the workload is heavy and there isnt too much time to actually develop your embedded systems.

# 2020-21

Not that difficult I think. Get a good group that can work well with. Not that theoretical in my opinion. Veryyyy slow feedback. Slides weren’t that interesting tbh. JZ (EIE)

One of my favorite modules! You get to be creative and to work with your friends. If you have some other knowledge about websites, electronics, ML, you can show off and apply it on the projects. Important to pick a good team as it can really reduce your workload when it’s a good one. Stott is also a great lecturer and you can ask questions during labs, GTA will (generally) help. - MG

# Deep Learning

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 5.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 5.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 4.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 5.0 out of 5
# Comments

Typical Mikys course. The marks are based on two submissions of reports and a small MCQ at the end. This really is just a if you work hard enough you will do well type module. You have to make sure to stay on top of the work because it is time consuming. its broken into 8 different sections report 1 is on the first 2-3 and the rest in final report. The cw is very much trial and error based and is done on python. There is already a lot of good advice so i wont repeat the same thing but honestly a good actually useful module for jobs etc and also a 'safe' module to take which is more predictable and well structured.

# 2020-21

This module is worth it if you want to find out about deep learning and how neural networks can be applied. I found the lectures to be nice, the GTAs were helpful and knowledgeable. However, I really enjoyed the Google Colab notebooks (in which you work with Keras models hands on). They really stimulate learning. Also...Colab Pro allows you to use Google Colab for longer time...but it’s perfectly possible to use the vanilla non-pro version if you manage your time well. In fact I kind of left tasks till the business end of term and I still got along fine without Pro. - Aaman (EIE)

Just use the Collab notebook, you can even get a headstart by cloning the previous year and doing most of the tasks+ report before they release it. TBF if you know a little about ML it’s a good way to get a good mark for people who are good at working autonomously – MG

Didn’t watch a single lecture and still got a decent grade. - Daryl

Not a very hard module if you can learn stuff yourself. You really don’t have to go to the lectures I think but it’s good to give your day routine. The Google Colab stuff was actually fun and machine learning helped. Use the feedback in the interim report because they like you to explain stuff in a certain way. Do not think you can leave the report last minute, I tried this and almost failed the module so make sure you leave time to run simulations, write up and format. Also split up the notebook running between mates and computers if you can. – Simi (EEE)

# Robotic Manipulation

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

This module was introduced in 2021-22

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 2 respondants.

  • Content: 3.5 out of 5
  • Organisation: 2.5 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 4.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 3.0 out of 5
# Comments

New course so things are still being established. The course is broken down into 1 big project where you have to programme a robotic arm to perform some tasks. you will be marked based on a video, report and live demo. Lab times are somewhat hard to get. there are only so many of them and you have to book them. they send out an excel sheet and it usually gets fully booked in like 10 mins and the good slots that aren't like 10-midnight get booked very quickly.Overall, very good if you want to get hands on but get ready to spend whole days from morning to night working in labs and then repeat that for a month or two. very time consuming. the mark scheme is clearly highlighted.

# EEE-Only Modules (Spring)

# Instrumentation

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 2 respondants.

  • Content: 4.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 4.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 4.5 out of 5
  • Overall: 3.0 out of 5
# Comments

Very difficult project, requires way more effort than one module should. Grading is not too strict though.

A very hard module, but had lots of GTA/UTA help! I don't however feel like the material of lectures was very much needed for the coursework

# 2020-21

Really good module overall that touches the tip of the iceberg of the art of instrumentation. The content is good but what really makes this module is Papavassiliou. He is a super helpful lecturer and provides a ton of practical engineering advice. The coursework seemed very weird to start off with and admittingly it took a while to fully understand what was required. Since it was remote, everything was done in LTSpice so it was a good way to learn how to use it. Also, the GTAs were fantastic too. They knew what they were talking about and provided a very student-esque approach/outlook to problems. Would recommend to anyone interested in instrumentation / biomedical / analogue. - HH

# Power Electronics

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 2 respondants.

  • Content: 4.5 out of 5
  • Organisation: 2.5 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 5.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 4.0 out of 5
# Comments

Don't know if it was due to other circumstances, but not finishing the content before the coursework deadline (which did get extended) was a bit jarring as spring term for year 3 is a very busy time; it makes it hard to organise time for each module

# 2020-21

Really good module, especially if you’re at all interested in switch mode power supplies or control. Due to being remote, there was no practical aspect so everything was in Matlab and LTSpice. The CW ended up being to design a full PC power supply. Mitcheson is a pretty good lecturer and the GTA was really helpful. Initially the CW was straightforward from the notes but got a lot more difficult by the end.

Great module to learn more about switch mode power supplies. I was remote so it was all LTSpice for me which requires A LOT of love and patience. Make sure you leave good time to write up the report and try and record results as you go. The CW gets harder as you have to do more complex simulations/ designs. The GTAs are incredible like please ask them anything – they are so useful and really want you to succeed. Mitcheson is the same. I didn’t really attend lectures and still got a decent grade. Finally when you’re writing the report or presenting, don’t linger on sections too long. Anyway overall really enjoyable

# Principles of Classical and Modern Radar Systems

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

# 2020-21

Really good module, would highly recommend the module. The content is challenging but explained well, and Manikas and the GTAs provide excellent support. The coursework is on MATLAB, and whilst challenging is certainly doable. I would advise doing Manikas’ Comms module in Autumn term – its not necessary but will help a lot. (EEE)

# Managing Engineering Projects

Imperial Module Page: here (opens new window)

This modules is only for students taking EEE with Management

# 2021-22

# Quick Summary

Average module scores from 1 respondant.

  • Content: 4.0 out of 5
  • Organisation: 4.0 out of 5
  • Lecturer: 3.0 out of 5
  • Overall: 4.0 out of 5

# 2021-22

Get working sooner rather than later with this module, assessments aren’t too difficult but can be time consuming

As mentioned above, assessments can be time consuming so get started with them as soon as possible. Some of the project management things explained in the module can be very useful for future internships/placements. The lecturer offers feedback on the essays/reports before you have to do the final submission so definitely send her a draft and make use of the feedback she gives.